Adelle Frank Drupal, religion archives and genealogy geek in Atlanta, Georgia

the web

Copyright in a Social World

Abstract: Miller gives a basic overview of and urges that students be educated in copyright law. She notes copyright's implications for online social networking using three web 2.0 examples: YouTube, MySpace, and Flickr. Finally, she discusses plagiarism both by students and of students' work.

Copyright and Collaborative Spaces: Open Licensing and Wikis

Abstract: Botterbusch and Parker use the example of wikis to explore the collaborative space they see between the two extremes of full copyright protection and full freedom of content.

Assume That Online Works are Copyrighted: They May Have More Protection Than You Think

Abstract: Harris surveys the many ways in which protected digital works can be used that may infringe on copyright. These infringements include:

Subject Headings 2.0: Folksonomies and Tags

Abstract: West explores how a work's "aboutness" is determined. She contrasts subject headings with folksonomies (tagging) as a classification method.

Search Smarter

Abstract: Rubenking aims to demonstrate how to form your initial searches to get the best results on the web, fast.

Finding and Using the Magic Words: Keywords, Thesauri, and Free Text Search

Abstract: According to Ojala, information professionals are distinguished by their use of the best search terms, which differ between the web (natural language) and for-fee databases (controlled vocabularies). She notes the usefulness of using keyword suggestions from web advertisers and questions whether our controlled vocabulary expertise will be useful in the future of free text searches.

Twenty-five years of end-user searching, Part 1: Research findings

Abstract: Markey limits her survey of the last twenty-five years of research on end-user searching to only intervention-free studies, namely transaction log analyses. Her summary of search behavior patterns is intriguing.

Copyright's Digital Dilemma Today: Fair Use or Unfair Constraints? Part 2

Abstract: Strickland explores the parameters of fair use in copyright law as of late 2003, including the DCMA, Teach Act, and various relevant legal cases and state statutes.

Getting Two for the Price of One: Accessibility and Usability

Abstract: Kirkpatrick argues that, when you design a web site for accessibility, you also “increase the usability of that site for everyone.” Giving best practices examples of accessible web coding, she shows how these also benefit non-disabled users.

Usability and Accessibility

Abstract:  To ensure that library web sites exhibit usability, Dowling delineates three categories of usability guidelines and eight steps that create accessibility.