Adelle Frank Drupal, religion archives and genealogy geek in Atlanta, Georgia

the web

Search Smarter

Abstract: Rubenking aims to demonstrate how to form your initial searches to get the best results on the web, fast.

Finding and Using the Magic Words: Keywords, Thesauri, and Free Text Search

Abstract: According to Ojala, information professionals are distinguished by their use of the best search terms, which differ between the web (natural language) and for-fee databases (controlled vocabularies). She notes the usefulness of using keyword suggestions from web advertisers and questions whether our controlled vocabulary expertise will be useful in the future of free text searches.

Twenty-five years of end-user searching, Part 1: Research findings

Abstract: Markey limits her survey of the last twenty-five years of research on end-user searching to only intervention-free studies, namely transaction log analyses. Her summary of search behavior patterns is intriguing.

Copyright's Digital Dilemma Today: Fair Use or Unfair Constraints? Part 2

Abstract: Strickland explores the parameters of fair use in copyright law as of late 2003, including the DCMA, Teach Act, and various relevant legal cases and state statutes.

Getting Two for the Price of One: Accessibility and Usability

Abstract: Kirkpatrick argues that, when you design a web site for accessibility, you also “increase the usability of that site for everyone.” Giving best practices examples of accessible web coding, she shows how these also benefit non-disabled users.

Usability and Accessibility

Abstract:  To ensure that library web sites exhibit usability, Dowling delineates three categories of usability guidelines and eight steps that create accessibility.

Users' information behaviour - a gender perspective

Abstract: Steinerová & Šušol (2007) use gender difference, an admittedly problematic social construction, as a nonetheless helpful lens through which to frame information behavior.

Human information behavior: Integrating diverse approaches and information use

Abstract: Spink and Cole (2006) survey the main research on human information behaviors – delineating three interdisciplinary approaches – problem solving, ELIS (everyday life information seeking), and foraging – proposing that a fourth – information use with modular cognitive architecture – may also be gleaned from the literature, and then attempting to construct an integrated approach from the comparison of those four approaches.

A nonlinear model of information-seeking behavior

Abstract: In contrast to discipline-specific, stage-based models of information behavior, Foster (2004) interviews interdisciplinary information seekers, and proposes a non-linear and cyclical model. His model describes three core processes and three levels of contextual interaction that are dynamic, shifting, and without an inherent sequence of occurrence.

Toward a model of the everyday life information needs of urban teenagers, part 1: Theoretical model

Abstract: After a brief literature review of research on ELIS (everyday life information-seeking) and on adolescent information behavior, Agosto and Hughes-Hassell (2006) present the results of their qualitative research gathered from twenty-seven urban teenagers.